Riveting Experience

It’s been a while since my last posting but I was on leave from work for a few weeks at the time and life gets in the way. One friend was prompted to write an email to me yesterday asking if I was ok. At least someone noticed I’d disappeared πŸ™‚

I won’t claim any huge progress on the 20 but a significant phase has taken place over the last few weeks in that I received in the mail my new riveting toy from the UK and I’ve riveted up a panel for one of the side tanks. That’s the only modelling I’ve been able to do over the last few weeks however today I took some time to trim the overlay to size and solder it to one of the tanks.

 

This is a photo of my new riveting machine which arived in the mail from the UK a few weeks ago. It's lovely piece of kit but poisonously expensive due to th mailing costs. My reommendation? Buy one when your currency is flying high as was the Aussie dollar a year or so ago, not when it's down as it is at the moment. I spent something 60% of the purchase price on mailing costs.

This is a photo of my new riveting machine which arrived in the mail from the UK a few weeks ago. It’s a lovely piece of kit but poisonously expensive due to th mailing costs. My recommendation? Buy one when your currency is flying high as was the Aussie dollar a year or so ago, not when it’s down as it is at the moment. I spent something 60% of the purchase price on mailing costs.

The riveter is from GW Models in the UK. They don’t have a web address nor email and don’t accept credit cards. Luckily I have a friendly pom who let me use his bank account to transfer the money otherwise I’d have been up for the cost of the international bank cheque too. In spite of all these issues this machine is an order of magnitude on from what I’d been using up till now and in my opinion it, or something like it, is mandatory for the budding scratch builder. You wouldn’t buy one unless you were planning on getting some use out of it and I have plans, so many plans… πŸ™‚ The major advantage of it is the relatively accurate X and Y table with dials calibrated in metric measurements. The photo shows the 7mm version which if memory serves is about 170 pounds. Postage was about 80 pounds and it weighs approximately 4.5kg. Ouch! But I’m in love and love is blind πŸ™‚

So the result?

I will need a little more practice and I did one experimental test piece that ended up in my ice cream container of off cuts and dud NS but I'm very pleased with the result.

I will need a little more practice and I did one experimental test piece that ended up in my ice cream container of off cuts and dud NS but I’m very pleased with the result.

I cut the second test piece to size this morning and soldered it to the tank blank and this is how it came out. The rivets are on .010 NS sheet and set out to a pattern that is from the Greg Edwards sheet. They are crisp and clear and best of all, straight. It gets a little boring sitting there rolling the wheels and pressing the handle but generally speaking the only thing you have to think about is whether you need to turn the little wheels one turn or two. Being able to rivet lines at 90 degrees to another line without having to remove the workpiece from the machine makes this machine worth most of the cost.

Nervous?

Bruce Wood, my future lunch partner, has asked me if I’m nervous about losing my bet with him that the KRM Z20 class kit might come out before I can finish my scratch built Z20….

This is a shot of the 20 just before I pack it to bring down to Sydney on the plane with me to the Aus7 Modellers Group Forum on Saturday.

This is a shot of the 20 just before I pack it to bring down to Sydney on the plane with me to the Aus7 Modellers Group Forum on Saturday. Everything you can see in the photo is compete: the dome and chimney are attached and the tanks are essentially as they should be.

He has to build the loco from the kit against my scratch built efforts. For one of us to claim the prize the resultant model has to be completed, running, painted and ready haul a train.

At the moment I have the cab to build and then I’ll start on the details and working on the rivetted overlays for the sides of the tanks. I’m currently assessing my DCC options: the speaker is going to be housed in the rear water tank/coal bunker with the decoder in the boiler. There will be a headlight front and rear, the marker lights will operate and it will have a flickering firebox. One issue I’ve discovered is that, with all that metal down one end and only urethane up front there’s a fair bit of weight imbalance. I think I’m going to have to weight the front of the loco. This won’t be so much to increase tractive effort, the bloody thing is going to weigh a ton without any added weight, but it does need to be balanced so it doesn’t run with its nose in the air. I’ll put some sheet lead between the frames over the bissel truck at the front and if that isn’t enough I’ll turn down a nice big metal slug to fit in the front of the boiler. This will only be quite short so there will still be room for the decoder, but it can be attached to the smoke box door and it will slide in and out when I need to access the interior of the boiler.

Nervous? Mmmm, I’m not sure πŸ™‚

In Its Natural Environment

I thought I’d post another photo of the 20, this tome on my layout Morpeth. I can’t emphasize how significant it is to me personally to finally have a Z20 class taking shape whixh will eventually run on my layout. This is theΒ locomotive that ran on the Morpeth line. It was ubiquitous on the line and shared duties with only one other class of loco in the period I model that I’m aware of. I’ve been modelling Morpeth for 14 years and this is the first time a Z20, or anything even remotely resembling one, has sat on one of my layouts. And there have been three that used Morpeth as a theme.

Very pleasing! πŸ™‚

I started work on the rear water tank/coal bunker after I made the post this morning. This strated out as a test in bending some nickle silver but once I'd started I couldn't see any real reason not to continue. The first test piece ended in the ever growing pile of off cuts and scrapped pieces in my ice cream bucket but the final box was able to incorporate a section from one of the larger offcuts so it's not all in one direction.

I started work on the rear water tank/coal bunker after I made the post this morning. This started out as a test in bending some nickel silver but once I’d started I couldn’t see any real reason not to continue. The first test piece ended in the ever-growing pile of off cuts and scrapped pieces in my ice cream bucket but the final box was able to incorporate a section from one of the larger off-cuts that was already in there, so the traffic is not all one way. The plain box will eventually get a wrapper with rivet detail applied.

I got some of my scratch building books out this afternoon to look up how the experts bend metal with curves in the corner. Geoff Holt described a simple method of clamping a length of solid brass or steel rod into a vice and bending the sheet material around this. I gave it a test and it worked fine. I then did some calculations and ran a test piece. This turned out to the exactly the same width as the footplate in spite of my best estimates: I even drew a plan! πŸ™‚ When I deducted some mm and re-bent a new piece it came out fine. Nothing wrong with the technique, it was more my experience in estimating how much material I would need that needed sharpening up. I drilled some holes and bolted this box onto the footplate with some 12BA bolts and nuts. The nuts are soldered inside the box on a small flap I bent into the rear wall. I’ll run shelf of angle around the inside top edge about 1.5mm below the top edge which the top plate will sit on. As this is the largest internal space by volume in a 20 I’ll probably try to fit the speaker inside this box with the decoder in the boiler.

PS: if you want to hear more about my adventures in scratch building the 20 class why not come to the Aus7 Modellers Group Forum next Saturday the 31st. I’ll have the loco there with me. Follow the link for details

And With The Wheels On

It feels like I’ve made some real progress on the 20 this past week. I’m lucky to be on some leave from work at the moment so I have quite a bit more time than usual to devote to the project. However the leave will end soon so it will be back to snail’s pace progress after that happens. I’m trying to use the time as effectively as I can and I’ve managed to essentially finish the chassis and footplate assembly in the last couple of days.

This shot demonstrates the progess I've made on the loco with one small cheat: the dome and ftack are simply sitting on the boiler. I'm not sure when I'll attach these. Probably after I've reached a stage where I think they won't get in the way of other work I'm carrying out on the loco.

This shot demonstrates the progress I’ve made on the loco with one small cheat: the dome and stack are simply sitting on the boiler. I’m not sure when I’ll attach these. Probably after I’ve reached a stage where I think they won’t get in the way of other work I’m carrying out on the loco.

It’s probably tempting fate but I think I can say with reasonable certainty that I’ve reached a stage where most of the really hard work has been done. The loco runs and all the moving bits are installed: what’s left to do is really just building a series of boxes around what you can see in this photo and adding some jewellery. DCC and wiring up the wheels is a whole different phase that will come much later. I would also like to acknowledge the help I’ve had from Keiran Ryan, David Peterson and John Birch. All three of them have contributed ideas and help in tracking down parts and tools.

So where am I up to? Well I’ve reached the stage where I need to take the thing from looking like a 19 on steroids to a 20: that means making and installing the tanks, rear coal bunker/water tank and the cabin. These parts are what will make it look like a 20 class right? Well yes, but it’s not as simple as that. The front spectacle plate you can see in the photo is the one from the PME etch for the 19. This came from David Peterson and I’ve utilized it to overcome a problem: it let me secure the rear of the urethane castings (the big grey lumps of plastic) to the metal footplate. If you look carefully you’ll see a threaded bolt emerging from below just in front of the brass spectacle plate that runs across the top and down the sides of the firbox. There’s another one on the other side. This does a nice job of retaining the boiler and back head but it does present me with a small problem. While the side tanks, the cab and the rear bunker at all bolted and riveted together on the prototype, this operation was done in a particular way and I was planning to carry out construction in the same manner. The arrangement on the prototype loco is that they essentially plonked two tanks either side of the boiler, another tank and coal bunker behind where the crew worked on a platform that was bolted onto the precursor loco (remember these tank locos were converted from excess tender locos) and then the cab was made up from a chopped down spectacle plate with a new one added to the rear and the roof plonked on top of this. So the real front spectacle plate was not like you see in this photo of my model: the real one was a stubby little thing that sits on top of the side tanks. The brass you can see in the model photo would have to be chopped off just below the side windows if I was following the prototype.

This photo is taken from inside the cab looking forward down the side tank. It's difficult to compare this with the view of my model because that photo is taken from the front of the loco looking back and I don't yet have the tanks made to give you a reference. However I've labelled the spot where the old 19 class cab looks like it was unceremoniously chopped up with an A and and arrow.

This photo is taken from inside the cab looking forward down the side tank. It’s difficult to compare this with the view of my model because that photo is taken from the front of the loco looking back and I don’t yet have the tanks made to give you a reference. However I’ve labelled the spot where the old 19 class cab looks like it was unceremoniously chopped up with an A. Follow the arrow.

So why is this a problem? Well it isn’t really but it is, if that makes any sense. I hadn’t done too much thinking about the way I was going to make the tanks and the cab till recently. I’d assumed that I’d make the cab first and then build the tanks around this. However as the cab literally sits on top of the tanks and is really just a bit of an umbrella help up front and rear by the tops of the tanks, I find I can’t really carry out the construction in this way. The complicating factor is that, while I would have liked to have followed the prototype and made the cab front, rear and roof like the prototype, now that I’ve used the etched front spectacle plate to hold the castings in place, I can’t cut this up and make it a stubby shadow of its former self and just bolt it to the top of the tanks. Instead I’ll need to chop into the tank and disguise where the spectacle plate travels down to my retaining bolts.

I can tell you one thing: the work you can see in the prototype photos where the old cab has been chopped up and new details added (such as the row of holes at the top of the rear spectacle plate) show the work was as rough as guts. This is not work of fine craftsmanship: it’s cut and shut of the roughest order! Look at the rough gap where the two plates of metal meet in the photo above. OMG! πŸ™‚

There are times when you reach a stage in the construction of a loco project like this where you need things to be glued, soldered or bolted in place solidly so you can push against them while you work around them. This is one of those times. I put the wheels back on the loco this morning and took this photo with the intention of giving myself a bit of a break so I could think about how and in what order I was going to build the tanks and cab. Having the firebox/boiler castings solidly bolted in place lets me build things up against these solid objects: all I need to do is decide how I’m going to do this πŸ™‚

Footplate V2.0

After working on the Z20 over the last few days I felt I was ready to make a post about progress and share a photo. Work on the chassis has essentially stopped for the past week while I’ve worked on getting the parts footplate parts made so I can solder the seven parts together. One of the reasons IΒ  moved onto the footplate before completing the chassis was that I wanted to check the fit of the last few components against the footplate as these were added. You can measure and look at plans and photos as much as you like but until you can fettle a part against the loco there’s no guarantee things are going to fit.

In this photo I've completed the assembly of the footplate and fettled it till it fits over on the chassis without apparent bending or sitting proud. I've placed the parts from the Century 19 class kit on the footplate to show how they will combine with the scratch built parts to complete the loco.

In this photo I’ve completed the assembly of the footplate and fettled it till it fits on the chassis without apparent bending or sitting proud. I’ve placed the parts from the Century Models 19 class kit on the footplate to show how they will combine with the scratch built parts to complete the loco.

I had reached the stage of making up the buffer beams and then applied these to the footplate that was shown in a previous post. For some reason I couldn’t explain things weren’t quite right and on checking it turned out I’d measured the original footplate incorrectly and it was a couple of mm too narrow. There really is nothing to be gained from putting off the inevitable so I cut new parts and started over. As I’d made a few other minor mistakes in version 1.0 I was able to correct these as I made the new components. The lesson here is that parts that you know are right act as gauges against parts that you assumed are right. If they aren’t right then you cut new ones and start again. I have an ice cream container that is accumulating a lovely collection of off cuts and abandoned .5mm NS parts πŸ™‚

The cast polyurethane sections from the Z19 class kit have been fettled a bit and placed on the footplate to give some sense of how it will go together. I don’t have any problem using parts from a kit in this fashion, in fact it makes a project like this far more approachable. However I suppose it stops it being totally scratch built. I don’t really mind this as long as it looks like a 20 and it runs well. I can forgive a loco a lot of inaccuracies as long as it runs ok.

The footplate is actually made up of seven separate sections of NS if you include the buffer beams which I’ve used to stiffen up the assembly. They are soldered to the ends of the footplate, not the chassis. Once I’ve prepared and assembled the cast parts I’ll attached these to the footplate with screws from below and possibly glue if I can’t find a way of attaching the firebox end securely with screws. As the footplate is made from .5mm NS it is a little floppy and the boiler assembly will go a good way to stiffening this up as long as I can find a way of securing it firmly. I’m looking at inserting a chunk of something like brass bar in the firebox front wall into which I can tap some holes for screws which will come up from below to achieve this.

Footplate

I’ve had a bit of time this week to get the brake gear applied to the chassis of the (Z)20. This required me to make a couple of cranks for each side of the loco and to hook these up to some brake shoe castings that are from a ModelOKits 19 class kit. This kit will be supplying a few parts for my 20 class project but not as many as one might imagine, considering that on the prototype quite a few of the (Z)20’s started life as 19’s. I began by getting the parts for the brake assemblies made over the last few days and yesterday I was able to solder all of this gear into position. This morning I cut out the parts for the suspension rocker bar that sits between two of the axles and then soldered these into position.

This afternoon I sat down and made a survey of the jobs left to do to the chassis. I have quite a bit left to do, not the least of these being the manufacture of the four sets of steps. These have to be attached to the chassis sides and I’ve planned out how I’m going to make them. I also have some pipe work to apply, some angle braces need to be made and attached on each side, a bit of rivet detail and the pickups to run power from the wheels to the DCC decoder I’ll be fitting also need to be installed. I also need to cut, bend and fit the four rail irons. So with all of these jobs left to do on the chassis, I did none of them and instead started to cut and fit the footplate! πŸ™‚

These parts of the footplate are still individual pieces at this stage. If fact I haven't even cut the parts for the front end yet. That's the section sitting on the ground in front of the chassis.

These parts of the footplate are still individual pieces at this stage. If fact I haven’t even cut the parts for the front end yet. The three parts of the front section of the footplate will be cut from the blank which is sitting in front of the chassis.

This afternoon I was toying around with starting work on the steps but I must admit that the temptation to cut the footplate out and make a start fitting it was overwhelming. I was at a stage where I needed to start to see what the footplate needed to clear things to fit properly, but in reality this was just an excuse: I was a bit sick of working on the chassis and wanted to do something different and the chassis is the real start of the bodywork.

When I had thought about reaching this stage in the project I had envisaged simply cutting out a single piece of mental, chopping it to length and Bob’s Your Uncle! Well things didn’t work out quite so simple in the cold light of…this afternoon. My inspection of the photos I have on hand this morning threw up something I hadn’t noticed before. On the locos that had been converted from (Z)19’s there is a distinct joggle in the footplate where the old 19 class steel had been bolted to the new front end. I present exhibit A:

This photo shows the edge of the footplate looking from the front, down along the right hand water tank. You can see the difference in the width of the footplate sections quite clearly in the bottom right quarter of the photo. How did I miss that? :-)

This photo shows the edge of the footplate looking from the front, down along the right hand water tank the bottom of which is the line of rivets. You can see the difference in the width of the footplate sections quite clearly in the bottom right hand quarter of the photo. How did I miss that? πŸ™‚ You can see where the two plates are bolted together behind the round air reservoir.

Now it doesn’t surprise me that I missed this detail: I’m no expert on the bodywork of the 20 class. However it does need to be included in the model and any idea of making the footplate from one single section of nickel silver was fast becoming a pipe dream. The slight rise on the rear of the loco under the coal bunker (which I’ve written about in previous posts) had meant that this section of the footplate needed to be a separate section, now the bolted on front end of the prototype loco was making that end look like it would need to be a separate section too. As it turned out I’ve decided that the simplest way to make the front end of the footplate is exactly how the prototype did it: I will cut three separate, long sections from the blank you can see in the first photo that will be attached to the main footplate with bridge pieces and the front edge will be secured by soldering them up to the front buffer beam. There’s no need for the buffer beam to be attached to the chassis, the footplate needs the stiffness that making this one piece will provide.

I marked and positioned the NS sheet in my metal sheer and took this photo just before I made the cut. The blank was actually too long to fit into the machine so I had to chop 2cm off one end.

I marked and positioned the NS sheet in my metal sheer and took this photo just before I made the cut. The blank was actually too long to fit into the machine so I had to chop 2cm off one end.

I got out a fresh sheet of .5mm NS and marked this for the correct width of the footplate. I made the chop with my metal guillotine and the piece came out perfectly. I’m getting better at this with some practice! πŸ™‚ I then cut two lengths for the rear and middle sections from this long blank and sat them on the chassis. I worked out that I should have added a bit of extra to the small rear section of the footplate (the part under the coal bunker) as the original method I’d worked out to connect this section to the middle, large section wasn’t going to work out too well. So I recut this section with 2.5mm added and then bent a small step into the plate. You can see this in the first photo of the model above. I then did some calculations and cut out some segments of the plate to allow a bit of daylight through and to ensure that the wheels weren’t fouled. I’m not pretending that this will reproduce what was on the real loco but after my experience of building the inside motion into the 19 I’m convinced that no one will see that there are rather large “slab” cross sections that weren’t there on the real thing. Once the tanks are in place you’ll be hard pressed to see anything down below. I’ll probably have to make some adjustments to the middle section of the footplate to clear things like he tops of the wheels and other protrusions but this will be small adjustments rather than major surgery.

All The Wheels On!

Today I found the time to finish making the pony truck and get it installed into the chassis.

This shot without the wheels installed gives a slightly clearer view of the pony truck. The front is covered by a plate with a curved cut out and the rear has a another plate with a tail. This is used to connect the truck to the loco via a pivot hole and bolt.

This shot without the wheels installed gives a slightly clearer view of the pony truck. The front is covered by a plate with a curved cut out and the rear has a another plate with a tail. This is used to connect the truck to the loco via a pivot hole and bolt.

After I finished making the truck I moved onto installing a small piece of angle with a hole drilled in it from which the truck pivots by use of a bolt. I may install some sort of springing to keep the truck on the track and smooth out its ride but I may just install some lead as a weight and leave it at that. I’ll think about this on the trip to Sydney and back over the coming weekend. Getting the piece of angle installed at the correct height and properly centred turned out to be a lot more difficult than I’d anticipated. There’s probably some smick way of doing these sorts of jobs but I’ve yet to find a better method than trial and error. I soldered the little piece on and pulled it off again about 4 times before I was happy with its position.

This shot is to demonstarte the way the pony truck is retained and pivoted on the left hand end. It's a fairly simple piece of bent nickle silver with a bolt through it but it does work.

This shot is to demonstrate the way the pony truck is retained and pivoted on the left hand end. It’s a fairly simple piece of bent nickel silver with a bolt through it but it does work.

I’d left the tail on the pony truck over long to allow it to be trimmed to length once I was able to place it under the chassis on a length of track. The height of the pivot point was fairly critical because the leaf spring castings project above the top of the wheel and if the truck isn’t sitting level with the rail head this sticks out like a sore thumb. Once I was happy with the position of the truck I trimmed the tail to length, rounded the end of it and bolted it into position.

Getting all the wheels installed is a bit of a milestone really because it marks the end of the “engineering” stage of the project. I still have to install the power pickups but essentially the chassis is complete from an operational perspective: everything else I do from here on is essentially putting on the non-operational details. I have a lot to do but it won’t be long before I cut metal for the footplate and that really will mark a stage in the project, moving from the chassis to the loco body. Very exciting πŸ™‚

Pony Truck

This coming weekend I plan to attend the Liverpool exhibition in Sydney where I’ll be working on the Aus7 Modellers Group stand on Saturday and the first half of Sunday. In a similar arrangement to last year I’ll have some tools and a project that I will try to work on and speak to passers-by about. There tends to be a lot more talking than modelling at these events but that’s what you go for. Of course I’ll be taking the 20 to be the subject of this all day “clinic”.

I’d like to have all the wheels on the 20 before I leave to drive the 900km to Sydney and today, with the successful delivery of the puppies behind us, I managed to put some work into the last stage of wheeling the locomotive, the leading pony truck.

This is the core of the two wheel pony truck. It has received a little bit of attention with a grinding wheel in a Dremel since this photo was taken to remove the feed sprue at the top of one of the leaf spring castings.

This is the core of the two-wheel pony truck. It has received a little bit of attention with a grinding wheel in a Dremel since this photo was taken to remove the feed sprue at the top of one of the leaf spring castings.

Before I could make this part I needed some brass tube in two different diameters and I picked this up a few days ago in Brisbane on a trip to a hobby shop and an outlet for extruded foam. Today I cut the side frames for the truck out of a couple of pieces of NS .7mm sheet and assembled the tube and some brass rectangular tube to use as the spacer.

This shot shows the truck with wheels installed.

This shot shows the truck with wheels installed.

After the parts were prepared I assembled them with some solder and a small amount of swearing. The axle-box and leaf spring castings were the last two of the six I’d ordered from Laurie Griffin in the UK and are exactly the same as those on the trailing bogie. The next step in the construction sequence will be to install two NS parts both sides of the spacer, one for the front which is a simple plate with a curved cut out and the rear one which has an extension on it that allows it to be bolted to the chassis.

This drawing by Keiran Ryan gives the general idea of what's coming up next.

This drawing by Keiran Ryan gives the general idea of what’s coming up next.

I’ll use some more .7mm NS sheet, cut to an appropriate width and shaped with a piercing saw to get the outline I need to replicate the frames you can see in the drawing. These will be soldered into position, provided with a bit of rivet detail and attached to the locomotive chassis with a small bolt. Easy peasy πŸ™‚

Jewellery

After I coughed a few times and put on a long face I was granted a day pass to work on my Z20 today. The labrador has another 3 weeks before she’s due so the whelping box can wait a couple more days. What I wanted to achieve by the end of my modelling time today was to have the three parts I was working on (the two sand or oil boxes and the brake cylinder) made and bolted to the side of the chassis. I’ve managed that and the photo that accompanies this post illustrates this stage.

The distinction between the two brass shapes bolted onto the side of the chassis is very clear in this photo. The one on the left was primarily made on my mill, the one of the right on the lathe.

The distinction between the two brass shapes bolted onto the side of the chassis is very clear in this photo. The one on the left was primarily made on my mill, the one of the right on the lathe.

I cut the boxes in half (I’ve sort of come around to the idea that these boxes are actually for a lubricant, the feed line exiting the bottom looks too small for sand in my opinion) and got them bolted on last night so today it was time to take the big step and make the brake cylinder on my lathe. I’ve owned my little Sherline lathe for a couple of years now but I haven’t actually used it. Personal circumstances and a new job put paid to my plans regarding how I was going to use this machine, but nothing seems to prompt the use of machines like these so much as a project: you don’t just make “parts” in a vacuum, you only start to make use of the machine when you have a project. Scratch building a locomotive or a piece of rolling stock is a perfect excuse to use a mill or lathe.

The lathe has been sitting on a lower shelf on the work table I have in the garage so I lifted it and placed it on the table top, after I’d cleared it of 18 months of accumulated junk of course! πŸ™‚ These lathes are small but perfectly formed and they are a quality product. Even to my untutored senses I can tell they are a superior product to the cheap mill I own. As is usual with me, I spent about 2 hours fiddling about with a component on the lathe and drawing a plan until I finally decided it might be a worthwhile exercise to actually trying turning some metal. I cut a 25mm long chunk of brass from a length of round bar I’d purchased a couple of weeks ago and got turning. I faced off one end (I love that kinda talk πŸ™‚ ) and shaved the section down until I got it to the shape you can see in the photo. I then milled off a very small flat spot on the rear side and drilled and tapped a 12BA hole which accepts a 1/4″ long brass bolt passed through a hole I drilled in the chassis. I also fixed a mistake I’d made in soldering the spacer you can see in the photo in the rear, so all in all this was a very productive day.

I’d give myself 6/10 for this little part. I did plan it out but I lack the skills to get it perfect and managed to cut the ring at the base of the cylinder a bit undersized. By the time I’d discovered the mistake I’d already removed the scrap I’d used to hold it at one end so it was much too dangerous to make any changes. It means I don’t really have enough of a “ledge ” to add the bolt head detail that can be seen in the prototype photo I posted last time. This bugs me but not enough to make me go back and make a new one πŸ™‚ I’ve already checked the swing of the bogie and it clears this hanging piece of jewellery, so everything is sweet.

The next steps will be the application of brake shoes, angle braces, some detail around these shapes and quite a bit of pipe work. After this is all done I’ll probably paint the chassis with a basic black coat and then apply pickups and put the wheels and motor back on. And of course I still have to make the leading pony truck.