Windows

While I had already started preparing the window castings yesterday, they still needed to be glazed prior to installation. I got onto that job this evening and glued the castings into the apertures with some super tacky glue, the type scrapbookers use. I find this white glue (which doesn’t smell anything like PVA although it looks almost exactly like PVA) holds castings like the Grandt Line windows securely while the glue goes off. It’s available at Spotlight or from the internet. A US brand is Aileen’s Super Tacky Glue but there are plenty of cheap generics available.

The window castings came out looking a very similar shade to the colour they started which was a mid grey. This wasn't intentional. I started by spraying them white and then gave them a light dusting with grey primer. My light dusting maight have been a little heavier than I'd intended :-)

The window castings came out looking a very similar shade to the colour they started, which was a mid grey. This wasn’t intentional. I started by spraying them white and then gave them a light dusting with grey primer. My light dusting might have been a little heavier than I’d intended 🙂

Why did I make the door green? I was once watching one of those home renovation programs and the interior designer who was decorating the house had placed a beautiful antique side board into an ultra modern interior. You know the sort of thing: white walls, huge glass windows and three pieces of furniture that make a bed of nails look comfortable. Anyway the theory was that an extremely modern interior could support a single, beautiful antique as a sort of stylistic contrast. On a building that is essentially covered in natural, dun shades, I feel that one small square of “primary” colour works as a counterpoint. That weathered green door is my antique. Well that’s my theory and I’m sticking to it 🙂

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4 thoughts on “Windows

  1. The green door…Good choice. In the dim, dark days of my childhood in the 1950’s, I remember dark green as being a universal ‘municipal’ color. Dull, dark & everywhere. Your door would be a very very faded tone. Perhaps add some dry wood streaking through?

    Anyway, it looks good in its own right.

  2. Trevor, green is a secondary colour. Red, yellow and blue are the primaries. I’ll forgive this lapse because I like you. But if you do it again, I’ll see you at lunchtime in my office for 30 minutes of revision on Basic Colour Theory. And don’t even begin think to argue that the inverted commas around “primary” will get you out of this detention.

    • *begin to think*… darned auto correct.
      And, the theory expressed in your post in spot-on; that a single focal point of strong colour balances all the neutral colour around it. The building is looking fantastic, strongly representative of Morpeth, a place I know well. Keep up the great work, and thanks for recording the process so well in the blog.

    • Lindsay,
      The inverted commas were to indicated that I knew perfectly well that green isn’t a primary colour. I went ahead and used the word anyway in the expectation some gouache jockey, who’s spent far too many years breathing in the fumes from mineral turpentine, couldn’t resist correcting me 🙂

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