Colour Applied

It’s nice to have some time to devote to modelling prior to trooping off to the rellos over Christmas. I’m also heading overseas for a couple of weeks in the new year so I want to get as much done on the mill as possible before I go. In spite of this desire to get some progress made it is amazing how fast things have moved today.

I'm about 90% done on the colouring job of the main struture in this shot. I want to remove some of the motar clour on the foundation and brickwork and I may add a little white to lighten these areas up and reduce the contrast. However the colouring is essentially done.

I’m about 90% done on the colouring job of the main structure in this shot. I want to remove some of the mortar colour on the foundation and brickwork and I may add a little white to lighten these areas up and reduce the contrast. However the colouring is essentially done.

Once I got started on the colouring process this morning things proceeded very quickly. An ink wash for the walls followed by an application of Tamiya acrylics to the bricks and foundation which was allowed to dry for a few hours after which I applied a light coat of light grey water-colour to both the masonry areas. This tones down the stark brightness of the colours straight from the Tamiya bottles and also allows you to remove some of the surface colour later with a damp cotton bud (que tip). The S-shaped wall anchors are Grandt Line castings.

I have the Grandt Line window frames painted, all I need to do is apply glazing. I had a minor panic when I realized I was out of clear styrene but soon discovered that I had some suitable material available, sourced from the packaging of some Christmas cards I purchased this morning. The joys of Christmas 🙂

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2 thoughts on “Colour Applied

  1. Hi Trevor,
    This is going to be a great building, in fact it already is. I just love the techniques in use, I must give them a try on a future building.
    Will you ultimately “distress” the rendered walls further to match the areas where it has crumbled away to reveal the bricks beneath?
    Regards,
    John

  2. John,
    Thanks, I’m pleased with the results so far. In answer to your question about distressing the walls more I have thought about doing this but I’ve decided against it. What might not be quite as apparent in the lower res photos I’ve been posting is that the walls are actually covered in thin cracks and fissures where the DAS has butted up to earlier applications. The ink has highlighted these but not quite enough for them to show up well in the photos. I think these are more than sufficient and more natural than anything I could apply with a tool. I want the building to look like it’s at the end of its working life, not totally derelict.
    Trevor

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