Speed Test

The other day after Bill from the US suggested I get on and build the body I thought I’d set myself a little test. In the last post I included a photo of the trailing bogie just after I’d cut the frames out with the piecing saw. I decided after Bill’s comment that I’d work at my normal pace for two or three nights to see how far I could get with fabricating the bogie by tonight (Friday) night when I’d normally knock off after about an hour of modelling.

I'm including this photo of the bogie quite deliberately in a fairly early condition: I've only just finished the soldering so I haven't cleaned it up or dressed it up with any details or fancy bits. The only cleaning is to scrub it with a bit of kitchen cream cleanser to keep the axles from rusting.

I’m including this photo of the bogie quite deliberately in a fairly early condition: I’ve only just finished the soldering so I haven’t cleaned it up or dressed it up with any details or fancy bits. The only cleaning is to scrub it with a bit of kitchen cream cleanser to keep the axles from rusting.

The above photo shows the result of about three hours work spread over two or three nights. The wheels turn smoothly and freely. What I’m not terribly happy with are the size of the rivets: in spite of testing and some initial trials, looking at them in this photo they look a little large and not terribly neat. They look pretty good in the flesh but that’s why I take photos and I can live with them. Believe me, if I couldn’t, I’d start again. I have two things to add to this bogie: the first will be a set of castings that replicate the leaf springs and axle boxes on the inside faces of the frames. These are NS castings from the Laurie Griffin range in the UK. Laurie is a real person and he’s very friendly. I sent him a photo of the parts I wanted to replicate and he suggested an item from his range. They aren’t an exact match but they are so close as to not matter. I’ll solder these into position with my resistance soldering unit to reduce the risk the frames and bolster moving when they get hot. I will also solder in some brass beams on either end of the bogie to stiffen things up a little. Both of these cosmetic items, the axle boxes and beams, will add much-needed weight to the bogie and help to keep in on track.

The parts for this small model were a mix of things I had in the box of bits for the project and some parts I’ve purchased recently. The wheels are in the Slaters range and have an 1/8″ axle. These incorporate the standard Slaters squared end on the axle to provide automatic quartering, retained with a counter sunk screw into the end of the axle. Because the 1/8″ axle is quite a bit thinner than a standard 7mm scale axle the screw is also thinner and thus the allen key to remove and tighten them into position is tiny. I don’t have one so I’ve had to order it from Slaters. Also the wheel-sets (two wheels, one axle and two screws in each packet) had been sitting about for quite a few years and had rusted up so I managed to take the head of one of the screws off when I tried to force it to shift. So Slaters got so sell me some spare axles and screws! 🙂

And the point of the personal challenge to see how much I could get done in a couple of nights? Well I’ve spent plenty of hours cleaning up messy castings in loco kits and made less progress in three hours with some kits than I have in this scratch building project. The point I’m trying to make is not about bagging kits, it’s that if you want something you can build it yourself. Even if it might take a while to learn how to make neat rivets 🙂

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3 thoughts on “Speed Test

  1. Nice job Trevor! If modelling is relaxing, you should feel like melted butter at the moment! Looking forward to the next instalment.
    Lindsay.

    • Lindsay,
      Yes, up here on the north coast we’re all very mellow 🙂
      I’ve just spent a half hour attaching the bogie to the chassis to see if it rides clear of the chassis frames. It does but the chassis is a little high. The springs on the hornblocks are quite stiff so until the weight of the body is bearing down on it, it will ride about 2mm higher than it should.
      I needed a spring to bear down on the top of the bogie and used one from a mixed bag of a couple of hundred I purchased from Micro Mark a couple of years ago. It was perfect! That must be a first 🙂

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